SBA Re-Opens Economic Injury Disaster Loans

NEWS RELEASE

PRESS OFFICE

 

Release Date: June 15, 2020                                Contact: Press_Office@sba.gov, (202) 205-7036

Release Number: 20-47                                         Follow us on Twitter, Facebook, Blogs & Instagram

 

 

SBA’s Economic Injury Disaster Loans and Advance Program Reopened to All Eligible Small Businesses and Non-Profits Impacted by COVID-19 Pandemic

 

WASHINGTON – To further meet the needs of U.S. small businesses and non-profits, the U.S. Small Business Administration reopened the Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) and EIDL Advance program portal to all eligible applicants experiencing economic impacts due to COVID-19 today.

 

“The SBA is strongly committed to working around the clock, providing dedicated emergency assistance to the small businesses and non-profits that are facing economic disruption due to the COVID-19 impact.  With the reopening of the EIDL assistance and EIDL Advance application portal to all new applicants, additional small businesses and non-profits will be able to receive these long-term, low interest loans and emergency grants – reducing the economic impacts for their businesses, employees and communities they support,” said SBA Administrator Jovita Carranza.  “Since EIDL assistance due to the pandemic first became available to small businesses located in every state and territory, SBA has worked to provide the greatest amount of emergency economic relief possible.  To meet the unprecedented need, the SBA has made numerous improvements to the application and loan closing process, including deploying new technology and automated tools.”

 

SBA’s EIDL program offers long-term, low interest assistance for a small business or non-profit.  These loans can provide vital economic support to help alleviate temporary loss of revenue.  EIDL assistance can be used to cover payroll and inventory, pay debt or fund other expenses.  Additionally, the EIDL Advance will provide up to $10,000 ($1,000 per employee) of emergency economic relief to businesses that are currently experiencing temporary difficulties, and these emergency grants do not have to be repaid.

 

SBA’s COVID-19 Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) and EIDL Advance

  • The SBA is offering low interest federal disaster loans for working capital to small businesses and non-profit organizations that are suffering substantial economic injury as a result of COVID-19 in all U.S. states, Washington D.C., and territories.
  • These loans may be used to pay debts, payroll, accounts payable and other bills that can’t be paid because of the disaster’s impact, and that are not already covered by a Paycheck Protection Program loan. The interest rate is 3.75% for small businesses.  The interest rate for non-profits is 2.75%.
  • To keep payments affordable for small businesses, SBA offers loans with long repayment terms, up to a maximum of 30 years. Plus, the first payment is deferred for one year.
  • In addition, small businesses and non-profits may request, as part of their loan application, an EIDL Advance of up to $10,000. The EIDL Advance is designed to provide emergency economic relief to businesses that are currently experiencing a temporary loss of revenue.  This advance will not have to be repaid, and small businesses may receive an advance even if they are not approved for a loan.
  • SBA’s EIDL and EIDL Advance are just one piece of the expanded focus of the federal government’s coordinated response.
  • The SBA is also assisting small businesses and non-profits with access to the federal forgivable loan program, the Paycheck Protection Program, which is currently accepting applications until June 30, 2020.

 

For additional information, please visit the SBA disaster assistance website at SBA.gov/Disaster.

 

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About the U.S. Small Business Administration

The U.S. Small Business Administration makes the American dream of business ownership a reality. As the only go-to resource and voice for small businesses backed by the strength of the federal government, the SBA empowers entrepreneurs and small business owners with the resources and support they need to start, grow or expand their businesses, or recover from a declared disaster. It delivers services through an extensive network of SBA field offices and partnerships with public and private organizations. To learn more, visit www.sba.gov

 


Think Dutchess Digital Ambassador- Kelly Lyndgaard

Kelly Lyndgaard- Unshattered

Profession: Founder and CEO of Unshattered

What attracted you to Dutchess?  Close enough to NYC to enjoy it but still rural enough to live in nature and be outdoors!

How has Dutchess County influenced you and your professional role?  I moved here as an executive with a worldwide corporation and ended up resigning from my career to begin a small nonprofit and invest in my community. 

Favorite Dutchess County past-time or activity? Hiking

Favorite Dutchess County eatery? Tomas Tapas

What do you think would be a surprise to anyone visiting Dutchess for the first time? How rural we are yet how close we are to many big cities and events. 

Advice to anyone visiting or looking to do business in Dutchess? You won’t find a better mix of city mindset but country life. There are so many incredibly talented people doing incredibly amazing things all hidden in plain sight. You don’t have the hustle normally associated with high achievers but you still have the great businesses and resources that high achievers create. 


Think Dutchess Digital Ambassador- Dana Jones

Dana Jones- Accessadoor

Profession: Founder and CEO of Accessadoor, LLC

What attracted you to Dutchess? I was born and raised in Dutchess County. After being able to experience the area as a resident first I knew it was the exact environment I needed to be in to start my company.

How has Dutchess County influenced you and your professional role? After growing up here and having a solid foundation of family and friends, it has allowed me to explore different interests and passions which eventually led me to becoming an entrepreneur. With all of the available resources available to small businesses and those just starting their entrepreneurial journey I knew I was exactly where I needed to be.

Favorite Dutchess County past-time or activity? One of my favorite things to do in my free time is to explore all the new restaurants and breweries in the area. It is a great way to spend time with friends and find new places to visit.

Favorite Dutchess County eatery? My favorite eatery in Dutchess County is Lola’s

What do you think would be a surprise to anyone visiting Dutchess for the first time? Well growing up in the area I think the one thing that has surprised me over the years is its ability to attract large corporations in addition to its constant ability to evolve and improve the area for people of all ages and interests.

Advice to anyone visiting or looking to do business in Dutchess? For anyone looking to do business in the area, reach out to other business owners. Everyone is extremely helpful and willing to help each other. It is a really tight-knit community and we all want to see each other succeed so don’t be afraid to ask around and get first-hand feedback.

 


Guidelines for Reopening Dutchess County

On Friday, May 22, Governor Cuomo approved the Mid-Hudson Region to begin Phase 1 of reopening contingent upon adequate numbers of contact tracers.  Beginning Tuesday, May, 26 Dutchess County is ready to move forward and begin the reopening plan. Information on reopening safely can be found in the links below.
Additionally, the Governor also announced the state would begin a loan program for small businesses and nonprofits with less than 20 full-time equivalent employees. Small landlords who have seen a loss of rental income also qualify for the program. This program would provide a low-interest loan to be paid off over 5 years. Pre-application for these funds will be opened on May 26. For more information on the program, click HERE.
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New York Forward Business Reopening Lookup Tool

Businesses in each region will be able to re-open in phases. Re-opening refers to non-essential businesses and business activities. Essential businesses and business activities that are open, will be able to remain open.

This tool will help you determine whether or not your business is eligible to reopen, and the public health and safety standards with which your business must comply. The guidelines accessible via the tool below apply to both non-essential businesses in regions that are permitted to re-open, and essential businesses throughout the state that were previously permitted to remain open. Eligibility for reopening will be determined by health metrics for each region.

New York Forward Safety Plan Template

Each business including those that have been designated as essential under Empire State Development’s Essential Business Guidance, must develop a written Safety Plan outlining how its workplace will prevent the spread of COVID-19. This plan does not need to be submitted to a state agency for approval but must be retained on the premises of the business and must bemade available to the New York State Department of Health (DOH) or local health or safety authorities in the event of an inspection. Business owners should refer to the State’s industry-specific guidance for more information on how to safely operate. For a list of regions and sectors that are authorized to re-open, as well as detailed guidance for each sector, please visit: forward.ny.gov.

If your industry is not included in the posted guidance but your business has been operating as essential, please refer to ESD’s Essential Business Guidance and adhere to the guidelines within this Safety Plan.

Business Affirmation Form

OSHA Returning to Work Resources

Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has provided general information and guidance for businesses as they reopen. The guidelines are broken down by industry and the website offers additional resources to reopen safely. 

Returning to Work Resources

CDC Reopening Guidance For Workplaces

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has released additional guidance for cleaning and disinfecting public spaces, workplaces, businesses, schools, and homes while preparing to reopen. Additional resources to prevent the spread of COVID-19 are also available.

CDC Reopening Guidance

NY Department of Labor FAQs for Employers

NYS DOL has provided additional information regarding frequently asked questions for employers.

NYS DOL FAQS

Additional Information

Regional Monitoring Dashboard

Reopening Metrics Explanation

Industry Reopening Guidelines

 


Economic Development Agencies Create COVID-19 Business Assistance Programs to Support Small Businesses

Think Dutchess Alliance for Business: Sponsor of the HVFBS

Dutchess County Economic Development Agencies Create COVID-19 Business Assistance Programs to Support Small Businesses

In effort to aid businesses unable to secure assistance, The Dutchess County Industrial Development Agency and The Dutchess County Local Development Corporation approved programs to increase financing opportunities for Dutchess County small business.

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

MAY, 13, 2020

POUGHKEEPSIE, N.Y —

 

To support and encourage local businesses in the production, supplies and distribution of personal protective equipment (PPE) and other COVID-19 recovery products to address increased demand, the Dutchess County Industrial Development Agency (DCIDA) met to approve a special Sales and Use Tax Relief Program. The fast tracked, no-fee package helps local manufacturers expand capacity and produce much needed personal protection equipment.

“Time is of the essence,” said Chairman of the DCIDA Board, Tim Dean on Wednesday. “It’s important to get this funding to the business community quickly to help our businesses in any and every way possible. This combination of relief and the expedited handling of the application helps us to support our businesses and the community as a whole.”

The program is open to all businesses in the Dutchess County that are currently engaged in or are beginning to manufacture, supply and/or distribute products for the treatment or prevention of COVID-19. Up to $100,000 in sales tax support will be granted to manufacturers, suppliers and distributors of these products.

These products may be used by health care and medical providers, first responders, home health aides, COVID-19 patients, and for residents’ personal use.  PPE may include medical and hospital equipment, disinfectants, sterilizers and sanitizer equipment, products and chemicals, as well as, medicine, pharmaceutical products and over the counter drugs to be used in the treatment and prevention of COVID-19.

“As a result of the COVID-19 crisis, the demand for Personal Protective Equipment and related healthcare equipment and sanitizing supplies has dramatically increased and is expected to remain in high demand,” said Think Dutchess CEO, Sarah Lee. “As the state will require hospitals and healthcare centers to have a sufficient supply of equipment and PPE supplies on hand in case of a second wave of COVID-19, the program allows local businesses to expand operations, support supply chains and drive the regional economy.”

More information will be shared via Think Dutchess Alliance for Business social media channels and at https://thinkdutchess.com/covid-19-business-resource-page/. For additional questions please contact: Think Dutchess CEO, Sarah Lee, at sarah@thinkdutchess.com.

Additionally, on Wednesday, May 13, 2020, the Dutchess County Local Development Corporation (DCLDC) Board of Directors also approved a proposal to create a Small Business Express Loan Program.

“Businesses, especially small businesses, have been hit hard. It needs to be acknowledged that from every corner of the county, the business community has done everything possible to protect public health, even if it has meant they making among the greatest sacrifices,” shared Think Dutchess CEO, Sarah Lee. “We are proud to offer Dutchess-based businesses that have suffered economic setbacks due to the current COVID-19 crisis have a new source of financial assistance. The program will provide a financial bridge to help businesses through these turbulent times.”

The small business express loan offers local businesses access to capital in a nimble and quick manner due to the economic challenges from COVID-19. The program will offer 0% interest loans up to $10,000 with a 36-month repayment term. More details on the program will be released soon.  In the meantime, please contact, Think Dutchess CEO, Sarah Lee, for more information at sarah@thinkdutchess.com.

 

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About the Dutchess County Industrial Development Agency

Industrial Development Agencies (“IDAs” are formed under Article 18-A of New York State General Municipal Law, as public benefit corporations.  IDAs were created to actively promote, encourage, attract and develop job and recreational opportunities and economically-sound commerce and industry in cities, towns, villages and counties throughout New York State (the “State”).  IDAs are empowered to provide financial assistance to private entities through tax incentives in order to promote the economic welfare, prosperity and recreational opportunities for residents of a municipality (“Benefited Municipality”). The Dutchess County Industrial Development Agency [DCIDA] was created to further economic development in Dutchess County by providing financial assistance to private entities through tax incentives including the issuance of bonds to facilitate the building of capital projects with the resultant construction jobs and permanent follow on employment. For more information about the DCIDA visit: https://thinkdutchess.com/ida/

 

About the Dutchess County Local Development Corporation

The Dutchess County Local Development Corporation (DCLDC) is a Not-For-Profit Corporation created by the Dutchess County government under the New York Not-For-Profit Corporation Law 2010 to promote economic development and job creation in Dutchess County.  The DCLDC induces companies to invest capital in projects that create jobs and increase the county’s tax base, thereby improving the quality of life for Dutchess County residents. Its mission is to reduce underemployment and increase employment; provide assistance and financial incentives for the formation, retention, expansion, and attraction of not for profit and for profit business to improve the economic vitality of the County. For more information about the DCLDC visit: https://thinkdutchess.com/ldc/

 

About Think Dutchess Alliance for Business

Think Dutchess Alliance for Business, formerly Dutchess County Economic Development Corporation, is the one-stop shop for business development needs and activities in Dutchess County, New York. A business-led, nationally recognized economic development corporation, Think Dutchess’ mission is to attract, retain, and expand for-profit and not-for-profit businesses in Dutchess County. Think Dutchess’ organizational structure includes programs in business retention, expansion and attraction; financial counseling and deal structuring; zoning and permitting; commercial real estate; innovation and technology; strategic marketing and municipal advocacy. For more information about Think Dutchess Alliance for Business, visit www.thinkdutchess.com

 


Dutchess County’s Walkway Over the Hudson Honors Frontline Workers

Walkway Over the Hudson Logo

 

 

CONTACT:  Geoff Brault

610.585.5743

gbrault@walkway.org

 

Walkway Over the Hudson State Historic Park Illuminated with 202-foot-long ‘THANK YOU!’ to Honor Frontline Workers During COVID-19 Pandemic

 

The Friends of the Walkway nonprofit organization and the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation, and Historic Preservation partnered to create this striking display on the World’s Longest Elevated Pedestrian Bridge

Walkway Over the Hudson Night Shot of 200 foot long illuminates thank you sign to honor COVID-19 frontline workers

 

POUGHKEEPSIE, N.Y. (April 30, 2020) –  To honor those on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic, Walkway Over the Hudson State Historic Park was illuminated by more than 1,300 luminaries coming together to spell out ‘THANK YOU!’, transforming the Hudson Valley’s most iconic landmark into the community’s largest display of gratitude.  In total, the display of light spanned more than 200 feet.  The project salutes everyone going to exceptional lengths to keep people healthy and society functioning in the Hudson Valley and across the nation.

“We hope that through this grand display across the Walkway frontline workers know just how much we appreciate their tremendous efforts,” said Elizabeth Waldstein, Executive Director, Friends of the Walkway. “That includes our partners at New York State Parks and the Walkway park management team, all of whom have gone above-and-beyond to ensure the bridge can remain open for those needing an outdoor respite.”

In the coming days, photo prints of the temporary light installation will be presented to key agencies in the community – places like emergency rooms, grocery stores, police stations, fire departments, and the like.  Beginning on Saturday, May 2 – I Love My Park Day – the public will be able to help extend the gratitude far and wide by purchasing prints and note cards at walkway.org to recognize those that have made a difference in their lives during the pandemic.

“The Walkway is one of the icons of the Hudson Valley, and there is no more fitting location to serve as the backdrop for this impressive gesture of thanks,” said John Storyk, Chairman, Friends of the Walkway Board of Directors. “In addition to a big thank you to frontline workers, I want to also extend thanks to everyone that lent their time and talents to create this spectacle.”

Friends of the Walkway board members, volunteers, and staff worked side-by-side with New York State Parks personnel to facilitate the creation of this display, the largest of its kind in the history of the bridge. Board member Kathy Smith developed the logistical plan and led the buildout of the light display. Board member Bob Kaminsky led production design. Scott Snell of SDI Imaging donated his aerial photography services to capture the scene. Walkway volunteer Irving Solero took on-the-ground stills.

At all times, everyone involved in the project followed New York State Department of Health best practices for being outdoors by wearing face coverings and working in shifts to avoid gathering.  Each of the 1,300 bags was marked with ‘Honor. Remember. Celebrate.” The New York State Bridge Authority lit the nearby Mid-Hudson Bridge in blue and white on the evening of the photoshoot. Two boats from the Dutchess County Sheriff’s Office provided uplighting on the Walkway superstructure.

“When the bridge first opened in the 1890s, it was known as The Great Connector, and I think it lived up to that nickname here,” said Linda Cooper, Regional Director Taconic Region, New York State Office of Parks, Recreation, and Historic Preservation. “We’re proud of the role that Walkway Over the Hudson State Historic Park plays in our community and that the bridge is able to be open at this time for people to get fresh air and exercise while taking in remarkable views.”

Governor Andrew Cuomo has designated that New York State Parks, including Walkway Over the Hudson, remain open and accessible to the extent possible at this time. To read the health and safety guidelines patrons are asked to follow before visiting the Walkway, visit parks.ny.gov/covid19.

For more information about the creation of this special project, including behind-the-scenes photos and video, plus a detailed account of how it all came together, visit walkway.org.

About Walkway Over the Hudson State Historic Park
Connecting the City of Poughkeepsie and the Hamlet of Highland in the Hudson Valley region of New York State, Walkway Over the Hudson State Historic Park is a renowned tourism and recreation destination visited by 600,000 people each year. Standing 212 feet above the river’s surface and more than 6,700 feet (1.28 miles) long, the Walkway is the longest elevated pedestrian bridge in the world. The park provides unique access to the Hudson River’s breathtaking landscape for pedestrians, hikers, joggers, bicyclists, and people with disabilities. The park is open daily from 7 a.m. until sunset, weather permitting. For more information, visit walkway.org.

About Friends of the Walkway Over the Hudson
Supported by a diverse coalition of members, donors, and corporate sponsors, the Friends of the Walkway organization is responsible for raising funds to enhance the Walkway experience, support capital improvements, and deliver innovative events that engage Hudson Valley residents and visitors, all contributing to the vitality of the region. Additional programs and activities supported by the Friends of the Walkway include the volunteer Ambassador program, Walkway tours and interpretative signage in the park, providing accurate and important information to visitors via the Walkway’s website and social media channels, the Walkway’s membership and merchandise programs, and much more. To learn more about how your support can improve the Walkway Over the Hudson and support the Hudson Valley, visit walkway.org.

 

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Small Business Administration (SBA) Announces Important Economic Injury Disaster Loan Program Change

Statement by Secretary Mnuchin and Administrator Carranza on the Paycheck Protection Program and Economic Injury Disaster Loan Program

Lapse in Appropriations Notice: SBA is unable to accept new applications at this time for the Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL)-COVID-19 related assistance program (including EIDL Advances) based on available appropriations funding.  Applicants who have already submitted their applications will continue to be processed on a first-come, first-served basis.

 

PRESS OFFICE

Release Date: April 15, 2020                 Contact: Press_Office@sba.gov, (202) 205-7036

Release Number: 20-32                           Follow us on Twitter, Facebook, Blogs & Instagram

 

WASHINGTON – Today, U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven T. Mnuchin and U.S. Small Business Administration Administrator Jovita Carranza issued the following statement regarding the Paycheck Protection Program and Economic Injury Disaster Loan Program:

“The SBA has processed more than 14 years’ worth of loans in less than 14 days.  The Paycheck Protection Program is saving millions of jobs and helping America’s small businesses make it through this challenging time.  The EIDL program is also providing much-needed relief to people and businesses.

“By law, the SBA will not be able to issue new loan approvals once the programs experience a lapse in appropriations.

“We urge Congress to appropriate additional funds for the Paycheck Protection Program—a critical and overwhelmingly bipartisan program—at which point we will once again be able to process loan applications, issue loan numbers, and protect millions more paychecks.

“The high demand we have seen underscores the need for hardworking Americans to have access to relief as soon as possible.  We want every eligible small business to participate and get the resources they need.”

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 About the U.S. Small Business Administration

The U.S. Small Business Administration makes the American dream of business ownership a reality. As the only go-to resource and voice for small businesses backed by the strength of the federal government, the SBA empowers entrepreneurs and small business owners with the resources and support they need to start, grow or expand their businesses, or recover from a declared disaster. It delivers services through an extensive network of SBA field offices and partnerships with public and private organizations. To learn more, visit www.sba.gov

 

Three Dutchess County Tech Companies Jump-starting The Start-Up Scene

Startups. They may start small but their impact is enormous!

Growing technology startups have the potential to alter a local economy’s landscape through innovation, job growth, and wealth & talent attraction. Dutchess County understands the importance of supporting its startups. Through programs that remove barriers, facilitate connections, and empower entrepreneurs to reach transformational status, Think Dutchess is proud to welcome three up-and-comers set to become transformational businesses.

A recent article in Digital Journal recently highlighted three of our young entrepreneurs.

 

2019 Innovation Challenge winners Easton LaCheappelle of Unlimited Tomorrow and Dutchess Community College graduates Dana Jones and Jacob Earnst of Accessadoor are utilizing programs promoting innovation to radically disrupt industries. Returning Poughkeepsie graduate Jessica O. Matthews of Uncharted Power is leveraging Dutchess County’s prime location and Poughkeepsie’s growing investment to further research and development. By leveraging these resources, these companies are making advancements in tech, advancing research and development, and forming significant commitments with the local economy that places Dutchess County, NY on the map for startups.

Learn more about these Dutchess County startups jumpstarting the tech scene in the complete Digital Journal article below:

Originally Published on Digital Journal, March 4, 2020 by Tim Sandle

How New York state is becoming the place for tech startups

BY TIM SANDLE     MAR 4, 2020 IN BUSINESS
New startups and an evolving technology-friendly culture are turning Dutchess County, New York into a tech hub. The proximity to New York City, affordability, and new growth creates the a [SIC] fertile space for startups. We looks [SIC] at three examples.
New York state, along the Hudson River, is buzzing with new technology companies, especially in the Duchess County region. As an example of some start-ups that are making a difference with cutting edge developments, Digital Journal has selected three of interest. These range from a company that is creating prosthetic limbs with a 3D printer to one that is seeking to revolutionize the power infrastructure.

 

Uncharted Power

With a focus on changing the energy infrastructure in a cost-effective way, this new startup has quickly gained momentum. as an example, Jessica O’ Matthews, CEO of this growing enterprise, has raised a $7 million Series A funding (according to Forbes). This is the largest ever raised by a black female founder in the U.S.

The company began with energy-storing soccer balls and it has since grown into a having a patented suite of technologies that can harness the power of kinetic energy by collecting, storing, transporting and transferring the energy into useable power. The aim is to revolutionize power infrastructure by integrating a platform void of power lines. This will provide communities around the world with clean, low-cost and reliable energy. At the end of 2019, Uncharted Power announced a six-figure investment into facilities in Poughkeepsie, New York which is set to open in early 2020.

Accessadoor

Marist College student Dana Jones founded the company Accessadoor in order to make all doors accessible, including for people with disabilities. This is by linking the door’s handicap system to an app. Nurtured by Dutchess County’s growing innovation space, 150 doors around Dutchess County will be included in the beta testing and the final product will be brought to market in early 2020.

Unlimited Tomorrow

Easton LaChappelle has been devising a solution, as Industry Week reports, to create an artificial limb device that is up to 95 percent cheaper than typical prosthetics and allows wearers to have a sense of touch to what they are feeling. LaChappelle partnered with both Microsoft and NASA and his company has collectively risen over $1 million through equity crowdfunding.

LaChapelle headquartered his firm in Rhinebeck, New York so that he could tap into the area’s access to an educated workforce and business support programs.

 

Dutchess County Food & Beverage Scene Drives Development

The Poughkeepsie Journal’s recent State of Dining Report: 2020 lauded the explosive growth of the food and beverage scene in Dutchess County. Thanks to a steady flow of talent, increased investment, and forward-thinking communities seeking to offer residents an exceptional quality of life, new businesses are flocking to Dutchess while local favorites are taking the opportunity to expand. Here are just a few to look forward to:

  • Zeus Brewing Company rooftop bar in the city of PoughkeepsieBetween 2014 and 2018, the beverage manufacturing industry grew 125% in Dutchess County, NY. Leveraging this explosive growth, companies like Zeus Brewing Co. are being attracted to growing city centers like Poughkeepsie to combine great food and dining experiences with emerging residential communities and business-friendly benefits leading to success for everyone.

 

 

 

  • Asahi Shuzo Sake manufacturing plant and tasting facility to open in Hyde Park NY, Fall 2020Our agri-business industry powers a robust supply chain of production and support services for food and beverage facilities. Meanwhile, The Culinary Institue of America churns out some of the top culinary arts and business talents in the world to keep the F&B industry moving forward. The combination of these benefits were a key factor in attracting international Sake manufacturer, Asahi Shuzo, to open a distillery and tasting room in Hyde Park, NY. The facility is set to open in 2020.

 

 

  • Eastdale Village attracting new and expanding food and beverage businessesSome local favorites are expanding into new areas and developments. Crafted Kup and Pizzeria Posto will join open additional locations in the $90 million Eastdale Village community. And with more than $1 billion in economic development planned in the City of Poughkeepsie alone and more than 800 residential housing units planned or in the pipeline, existing F&B businesses have plenty of opportunities to grow their footprint. Read more about the recently announced Eastdale expansions HERE.

 

 

Want to learn more about how to join these successful food and beverage companies? Contact:

Chris Glancy

chris@thinkdutchess.com

845.463.5404

 

These Dutchess County Destinations Drive Economic Development

Dutchess County- Visit. Play. Start. Stay.

According to a recent Forbes article, the Hudson Valley is one of the top places to visit in 2020. While Dutchess County residents have long been aware of the many historic, cultural and culinary treasures to savor in the area, it’s important to note the role tourism plays in our economy. Generating more than $600 million in spending, creating jobs, and attracting visitors and other related businesses, tourism is part of our economic engine driving investment.

From historical spots like Locust Grove, Val-Kill and the FDR National Historic Site, to outdoor amenities like Mt. Beacon, Dover Stone Church and everything in between, our one-of-a-kind destinations have spawned successful industry clusters and communities as a result of tourism. Take a look at a few of the top destinations that drive economic development in Dutchess County.

Dia:Beacon

At the forefront of revitalization. Dia:Beacon’s transformation of a long-vacant manufacturing facility re-energized the city of Beacon. As artists came to admire the works at Dia:Beacon, other creatives discovered the benefits of combining proximity and location with an unsurpassed quality of life. Visitors and entrepreneurs like Niche Modern were drawn to Dutchess County to build a booming craft manufacturing industry and revitalize the city of Beacon.

The Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park-

An educational institution known to outsiders as the go-to spot for fine dining, famous graduates include the likes of Anthony Bourdain, Cat Cora and Duff Goldman, just to name a few. While outsiders come to visit a culinary destination, we see it as an engine for tourism and talent. This educational facility infuses talent into the local, regional and worldwide food scene that have given Dutchess County restaurants like Mill House Brewery and Charlie Palmer’s Willow at the new Mirbeau Inn and Spa in Rhinebeck. As a key partner in the food and beverage industry the Culinary’s partnership in the Hudson Valley Food & Beverage Summit brings access to educational networking opportunities for local food and beverage producers. Additionally, soon-to-open sake brewery, Asahi Shuzo noted that the CIA was a key factor in locating their new business in Dutchess County.

The Dutchess County Fairgrounds– 

 

While the Dutchess County Fair attracts approximately 500,00 visitors each year, the grounds are more than just the signal of summertime’s end. The second-largest fair in NY supports the agribusiness industry with hundreds of agricultural and horticultural booths, displays and events.  Additionally, it is home to the Sheep & Wool Festival, Food and Wine Festival, and the County Living Fair.  These events offer local farms, craft manufacturers and entrepreneurs an opportunity to showcase and grow their businesses.

The Walkway Over the Hudson

The world’s second-longest pedestrian bridge hosts more than 500,000 visitors each year. While the bridge offers amazing views and healthy lifestyle options with its connections to the Dutchess, Hudson Valley and Empire State Rail Trail systems, it also helped draw attention to another city primed for redevelopment– Poughkeepsie. The river views have brought attention to the city’s waterfront and ease of travel to and from major metros. As new residents arrive, new housing developments like The Water Club and One Dutchess are building a luxurious waterfront community.  Additionally, nearby developments like 40 Canon and Queen City Lofts are building new community spaces and attracting additional options that enhance work, life and play like Fit Social and Revel 32.

Whether you’re an entrepreneur living in Dutchess, an existing business looking to expand, or you’ve visited Dutchess County and are thinking of relocating- Think Dutchess is your one-stop-shop for business development. Contact us with any questions: info@thinkdutchess.com.

 

 

 

ONE UNIFIED VISION

A premier business-led organization, Think Dutchess Alliance for Business brings together 11 agency partners creating a one-stop shop for your site selection, financing, incentives, permitting and advocacy, strategic planning and counseling, marketing and networking needs.